Saft, a designer and manufacturer of high-tech industrial batteries, will provide the megawatt-level lithium-ion (Li-ion) energy storage system (ESS) for one of Europe's first large-scale electricity storage projects.

In 2013, a fully integrated Saft ESS capable of delivering 1 MW of power for up to 3 hours will be commissioned on the Spanish island of Gran Canaria. Endesa, Spain's largest electric utility and part of the Inel Group, is leading this project demonstrating how energy storage can maximize the integration of wind or photovoltaic renewable energy within utility networks and optimize the grid infrastructure.

The Storage Technologies of Reliable Energy (STORE) project, which is partly funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness's Center for the Development the Development of Industrial Technology, is designed to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of large-scale energy storage. This storage can reduce the need for grid infrastructure upgrades, lower system operation costs and further increase the penetration of intermittent renewable generation within power networks.

“Energy storage is one of the new paradigms that will determine the direction of the electricity business in the medium term,” said Pablo Fontela Martinez, Endesa's STORE project manager. “The constant growth in renewable energy generation on the Canary Islands places a much greater load on their transmission infrastructures and electrical distribution, while the nature of the local geography makes it extremely difficult to carry out traditional upgrading projects. Installing Saft's ESS on Gran Canaria is an ideal opportunity to evaluate the technical and economic viability of this solution by making reserves of energy available in isolated locations distribution stations and even for energy arbitrage.”

For the STORE project, Saft will deliver a fully integrated turnkey ESS based on the Intensium Max 20 containerized systems. These systems consist of Li-ion battery modules, power management and control interfaces, air conditioning and safety devices, together with the appropriate power-conversion system for connection to Gran Canaria's grid. The system will deliver 3 MWh of energy to help smooth the peak demand on a substation and compensate for intermittent production of wind farms and solar photovoltaic installations, as well as delivering ancillary services such as network frequency and voltage control.

For more information, visit www.saftbatteries.com.