At 8 p.m. EDT Oct. 29, the National Hurricane Center reported Sandy made landfall near Atlantic City, New Jersey as a post tropical cyclone. As of 2 p.m. EDT Oct. 30, the affected states reported a total of 8,204,914 customers without power in the affected areas, according to the Department of Energy. There is some increase in outages as the storm moves west-northwest. A state of emergency has been declared for Connecticut, Delaware, Washington D.C., Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Virginia, and West Virginia.

The Edison Electric Institute reports on its site that more than 53,000 workers have joined forces to restore power on the East Coast.

The following information is based on the Department of Energy's situation report (for continual updates, see the DOE Situation Report):

Connecticut Light and Power reported Oct. 29 that more than 1000 line workers arrived and are working from as far away as the Pacific Northwest, Texas and Washington. In Delaware, Delmarva Power announced that it has mobilized nearly 2,000 employees and contractors to restore power to those affected.

Pepco, serving Washington, DC and Maryland, reported that PHI, Pepco's parent's company, has secured 1,563 line personnel from states as far away as Texas and Mississippi. In addition, it has nearly 600 internal and contract line personnel and 300 tree removal personnel on the system ready for quick mobilization. Nearly 400 customer call representatives are available to answer calls, about 165 assessors are ready to identify storm damage, and around 635 support personnel are working on their special storm response roles.

Duke Energy, on Oct. 29, made 1,200 line workers available to help other utilities restore power in Hurricane Sandy’s aftermath. Most of the workers are contractors who normally work in the service areas of Duke Energy and Progress Energy. Line workers directly employed by Duke Energy and Progress Energy will remain in the company’s service areas to handle existing and potential outages in those locations.

Bangor Hydro and Maine Public Service reported that they will have 63 crews available to work the storm and 17 tree crews from Asplundh. Maine Public will have 24 crews available to work and five tree crews from Asplundh. Each utility will assist the other as needed once they've handled outages in their own service territory. In addition, their sister utility from Nova Scotia will assist as needed and local line contractors have been placed on standby as well.

Pepco, serving Washington, DC and Maryland, reported that PHI, Pepco's parent's company, has secured 1,563 line personnel from states as far away as Texas and Mississippi. In addition, they have nearly 600 internal and contract line personnel and 300 tree removal personnel on the system ready for quick mobilization. Nearly 400 customer call representatives are available to answer calls, about 165 assessors are ready to identify storm damage, and around 635 support personnel are working on their special storm response roles.

Baltimore Gas & Electric (BGE) reported that more than 4,100 employees, contractors and out-of-state linemen, tree personnel and support staff are mobilized at BGE facilities and four staging sites. This includes approximately 1,700 out of a requested 3,000 out-of-state and contract linemen, tree personnel and support staff from Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee and Texas.

Southern Maryland Electric Cooperative (SMECO) announced yesterday evening (October 29) that it has assembled a team of about 500 field workers—including SMECO linemen, contract linemen, and cooperative linemen, along with tree crews –to restore electric service to affected areas. They reported this is the largest group of assembled linemen and service restoration personnel in their history.

As of 7:30 a.m. Oct. 30, First Energy reports preliminary estimates indicate the possibility for lengthy outages in Maryland. Approximately 7,800 company personnel and out-of-state crews are assisting with service restoration in New Jersey, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Maryland. While assessment of the damage by utility workers will be ongoing, the slow-moving nature of the storm will slow the process and hamper the conduct of restoration work.

NSTAR in Massachusetts reported that, in advance of the storm’s arrival, the company opened its emergency operations center and staffed its regional work centers across the state. Approximately 1,200 contract personnel from as far away as Texas and the Midwest are assisting NSTAR’s 3,000 employees in their efforts.

In Massachusetts, National Grid reported that it has begun restoration efforts with 348 restoration crews and 224 tree crews working to restore power.

Michigan Detroit Edison reported all available DTE Energy crews are working to restore service. DTE Energy is attempting to recruit assistance from other electric utilities but, most resources are already committed to that massive restoration effort.

As of 8:30 p.m. Oct. 29, Public Service of New Hampshire (PSNH) reports some of the 550 requested line and tree personnel from as far away as Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas have arrived to join more than 100 PSNH and local contractor line crews and 100 tree trimming crews already in place for the restoration effort. Across its service territory in New York, New Hampshire, Massachusetts and Rhode Island, National Grid has on the ground thousands of employees in support roles and hundreds of supplemental crews from across the US and Canada. National Grid anticipates a second wave of additional personnel from other states once the storm is over.

New Jersey Public Service Electric and Gas (PSE&G) reported today (October 30) it has a workforce consisting of 1,500 technicians - 600 PSE&G employees and 950 outside workers from Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Wisconsin. The company estimated today that some customers may be without service for seven or more days. Last night excessive flooding created by the storm surge affected a large number of substations in Essex, Hudson and Middlesex counties. PSE&G has taken these stations out of service until the water recedes, the equipment can be cleaned and dried, and the stations can be safely re-energized.

Atlantic City Electric reports that due to the magnitude of the storm, estimated times of restoration have been suspended until personnel are able to assess damage.

Orange and Rockland, serving New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania estimated today (October 30) that a majority of its customers without power should have electricity restored within 10 days, but complete repairs and total service restoration could take weeks. These projections are very preliminary and will be adjusted as the full extent of the damage is determined. Because of the widespread damage the hurricane has caused to O&R's electric transmission and distribution system — including 17 transmission circuits down, 12 substations off line and 100 circuits locked out — O&R will have to rebuild much of those systems. O&R has mobilized and deployed about 1,000 O&R employees who were joined by about 800 contractor field workers. More personnel are expected to arrive through the week.

Jersey Central Power and Light (First Energy) has approximately 7,500 company personnel and out-of-state workers are assisting with service restoration in New Jersey, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Maryland but anticipate lengthy outages in the storm's wake. While assessment of the damage by utility workers will be ongoing, the slow-moving nature of the storm will slow the process and hamper the conduct of restoration work.

At 11:30 a.m. today (October 30), Consolidated Edison reports that customers in Brooklyn and Manhattan should have power restored in four days. Customers in areas serviced by overhead lines may take over a week for restoration to be complete. The company cut service last night to two areas of Lower Manhattan and to an area of Brooklyn. Con Ed stated that this was done to protect the underground delivery system equipment from flood waters so that the restoration would happen quicker. The electrical equipment which is in flooded area must have all of its components cleaned of sea water, dried, and then tested.

Central Hudson Gas and Electric reported the storm caused damage to one substation and five transmission lines, and seven major distribution circuits were out of service. Central Hudson is deploying 700 employee line personnel, contractors, and mutual aid crews from Florida, Iowa, Indiana, and Wisconsin. It anticipates additional resources will arrive later in the week. The utility must address more than 900 distinct damage locations. New York State Electric and Gas reports the first phase of the service restoration process, damage assessment, will begin once the storm passes, perhaps on Wednesday (October 31).

Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) personnel have begun making assessments. Numerous areas remain inaccessible due to flooding and debris on roadways. The utility reports that several LIPA facilities near the south shore have already been impacted by severe flooding. In addition, localized flooding has made many roads inaccessible to restoration crews. LIPA anticipates assessments can begin after 7AM today (October 30) and expects some customers to be without power at least 7 to 10 days.

In New York, National Grid has begun restoration efforts with 400 restoration crews working to restore power. The company estimated today (October 20) that restoration should be complete in 48 hours for most customers.

As of 7:30 a.m. today (October 30), First Energy reports preliminary estimates indicate the possibility for lengthy outages. Approximately 7,800 company personnel and out-of-state crews are assisting with service restoration in New Jersey, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Maryland. While assessment of the damage by utility workers will be ongoing, the slow-moving nature of the storm will slow the process and hamper the conduct of restoration work.

As of 10:15 pm yesterday (October 29), Duquesne Light reports personnel are in the process of restoring power by removing trees and repairing downed wires. System restoration time is undetermined at this time, as the damage to the electrical system is still being assessed.

PECO has mobilized more than 3,000 employees, contractors and out-of-state crews. The effort includes more than 1,500 field personnel from utilities in areas such as Tennessee, Kentucky, Louisiana and Mississippi, as well as field personnel from PECO’s Chicago-based sister utility ComEd. There is the potential that PECO may not be able to immediately provide estimated restoration times until it is able to more fully assess damage to our system.

As of 7:30 AM 10/30/12, First Energy reports preliminary estimates indicate the possibility for lengthy outages. Approximately 7,800 company personnel and out-of-state crews are assisting with service restoration in New Jersey, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Maryland. While assessment of the damage by utility workers will be ongoing, the slow-moving nature of the storm will slow the process and hamper the conduct of restoration work PPL Utilities reported today (October 30) that restoration efforts have begun but anticipates that some customers may be without power for up to a week.

Citizens Electric reports as of 11:30 AM today (October 30) that restoration efforts are underway and most customers should have power restored by tonight, however, some customers may be out until tomorrow. The restoration work involves replacing broken poles and about 20 spans of overhead line. As of 7:30 am today (October 30), First Energy reports preliminary estimates indicate the possibility for lengthy outages. Approximately 7,800 company personnel and out-of-state crews are assisting with service restoration in New Jersey, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Maryland. While assessment of the damage by utility workers will be ongoing, the slow-moving nature of the storm will slow the process and hamper the conduct of restoration work. Rhode Island In Rhode Island, National Grid has begun restoration efforts with 128 restoration crews and 151 tree crews working to restore power.

Tennessee Appalachian Power, serving West Virginia, Tennessee, and Virginia, reports that more than 400 outside workers are positioned in areas where outages are expected and will assist more than 500 locally based Appalachian Power employees with service restoration. The storm is still in process and restoration estimates will not be available until after the storm has passed.

As of 9:30 AM today (October 30) Vermont Electric Cooperative reports that all areas will be restored by 3PM today (October 30). On 10/29/12, Green Mountain Power reports nearly 1,000 employees and personnel from out-of-state and Canada are working to respond to outages. Virginia Dominion Power announced today (October 30) that it is conducting an assessment of the storm damage and its personnel and personnel from outside companies are restoring power to customers.

Northern Virginia Electric Cooperative reports its crews and extra line and tree crews from North and South Carolina are assisting in restoring service to NOVEC’s customers. Shenandoah Electric Cooperative (SVEC) reports crews from SVEC, other cooperatives, and contractors are prepared to respond to the outages, and will do so, as weather conditions allow. Appalachian Power, serving West Virginia, Tennessee, and Virginia, reports that more than 400 outside workers are positioned in areas where outages are expected and will assist more than 500 locally based Appalachian Power employees with service restoration.

As of Noon today (October 30), the utility stated that the storm was still impacting customers in its service area and reported that restoration will take several days. Rappahannock Electric Cooperative reports that restoration efforts are underway and storm damage assessment will continue throughout the day. Mutual Assistance crews from cooperatives in Mississippi, Tennessee, and Georgia are assisting in the effort.

Appalachian Power, serving West Virginia, Tennessee, and Virginia, reports that more than 400 outside workers are positioned in areas where outages are expected and will assist more than 500 locally-based Appalachian Power employees with service restoration. As of Noon today (October 30), the utility stated that the storm was still impacting customers in its service area and reported that restoration will take several days.

As of 7:30 am today (October 30), First Energy reports preliminary estimates indicate the possibility for lengthy outages. Approximately 7,800 company personnel and out-of-state crews are assisting with service restoration in New Jersey, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Maryland. While assessment of the damage by utility workers will be ongoing, the slow-moving nature of the storm will slow the process and hamper the conduct of restoration work.